The Learning Experience

The thing about writing is, you always end up changed somehow. After every story, you take a step back and say, “Wow. I learned something.” Because writing is an experience in which you practically live in your mind and pour your heart out onto paper. This process makes you grow as a person and writer; it makes you learn things you never knew before, and it makes you discover things about yourself. Even if it’s as simple as, “Wow, I really hate this premise,” you’ve learned something: you should never try to write a story with that premise again.

Okay just kidding. If, in the future, you go back to that story you thought was horrible and you find you like it, by all means, you’re welcome to rewrite it or whatever. More power to you, because that’s something I’ve never been able to do.

My point is, no matter how good the story turns out, you always learn something. I have found that for every story I write, I always learn something about myself, and I always learn something about God.

My most recent story was about these twelve characters who represent the twelve disciples. They go on a quest to achieve who-knows-what (I hardly even know yet. Maybe I should figure that out.) I think, now that I’ve taken a step back from it, that I can say that what I learned about myself was that I am capable of breaking past the boundaries I set for myself. I wrote this particular story during November for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). Going into it I thought that it was downright impossible to write an entire novel in just one month. I thought that there was no way I could stay on top of my daily and weekly word count goals. I had never even attempted it before, and at the time I thought it was extremely ambitious. Impossible. I would never succeed. Furthermore, how was I supposed to write anything when I barely even knew what would happen in the story?

It turned out that all those boundaries I had set up for myself at some point were all false. Last month I learned that I could do what I thought was impossible, and that that statement applied to all areas of writing. I learned that I shouldn’t assume I couldn’t do something until I attempted it.

Now I could go on and on about what I learned about God. And yet, it is harder to put into words. Every time I write a story, it’s like I rediscover the Gospel for the first time. Sometimes I find a new aspect of it that I had never realized before. For example, one of my stories (I wrote this one about a year or two ago) focused on the theme of slavery: we are slaves to sin until we accept what Christ did for us. Then he frees us from our bondage and makes us slaves to Himself. While writing that story, I really explored this theme and was led to specific passages of the Bible that talked about it. Romans 6 is one of my favorites. But no matter what specific theme my story is exploring, I always end up seeing the Gospel in a new light.

Sometimes, this seeing of the Gospel also leads to moments of self-discovery: “There are people in this world who are still in sin’s bondage. Therefore, I MUST find them and show them the truth.” That one story in particular changed my views on everything. It changed my view of the world, it changed my view of God, and it even changed my view of myself. (Coincidentally, it was because of that one story that I realized I wanted to be a writer.)

So, writers are always learning things. I personally love the process of writing and discovery. I always look forward to writing new stories because of all the things I know I’ll be learning. I think the coolest part, though, is everything God teaches me about Himself. I always love seeing the Gospel as if it was my very first time. The Gospel is just one of those stories that never gets old – like those timeless stories I mentioned in my last post. Except the Gospel is the Timeless Story, because it gets woven into many, many countless other stories.

So, if you write, what do you learn from it? How have you grown over the years because of it? I’d love to hear from you!

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